| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

View
 

Russian Anarchist letters in Amsterdam

Page history last edited by john 4 years, 5 months ago Saved with comment

 [Some information on Russian anarchists whose letters are preserved in the Senya Fleshin (Fléchine) archive at the International Institute of Social History in Amsterdam.]

 

Introduction

If you want to know more about Bolshevik persecution of the Russian anarchist movement or anarchist solidarity with it, you should read the Bulletin of the Joint Committee for the defense of revolutionists imprisoned in Russia (1923-26) and the Bulletin of the relief fund of the International Working Men's Association for anarchists and anarcho-syndicalists imprisoned or exiled in Russia (1926-31). They published contemporary eyewitness accounts of the repression, which makes them a vital source of information. Inevitably they're a partial source: they couldn't publish everything. Also, they chose to protect the identities of their comrades inside Russia. Correspondents and other prisoners and exiles are often just referred to by a single initial, which makes identifying them a challenge.

The International Institute of Social History in Amsterdam hold the Fléchine (Fleshin), Yelensky and Maksimov (Maximoff) archives. These archives are full of documents which would help reconstruct both the Bolshevik crushing of the anarchist movement, and the anarchist response. Many of these files are given a quick and basic listing: "Illegal letters from Russia. 1922-1925" (Fléchine papers, folder 80); "file of letters from Russian exiles 1923-1927" (Boris Yelensky papers). But in the Fléchine papers the letters dated 1926-32 written to Senya Fléchine and Jacques Doubinsky in connection with the Relief Fund of the International Working Men's Association have been listed by name and date. They fill 31 folders. Presumably the bulk of these letters are in Russian, but some might be in Yiddish or even English.

What follows is a listing of who these people are, a cross section of the Russian anarchist movement [nb, of course, it's possible that some of the unidentified people are 'non=party', SRs, etc.]. That's one reason to produce this list. But it's also a signpost to further research. Translating these letters would fill some of the gaps in what we know from the Bulletins of the Joint Committee and IWMA Relief Fund. Beyond that, what else might we learn? What will we hear from anarchist voices that have been silenced for seventy years?

 

The International Institute of Social History website is at: http://www.iisg.nl/

Memorial website (in Russian) is at: http://socialist.memo.ru/

NB names are transliterated from Russian twice: ISO (which the IISG/IISH use) and Library of Congress-style.

 

edit: you can see images of the originals at http://senyafleshinpapers.wordpress.com/

 

Russian anarchists whose letters are preserved in the Senya Fleshin (Fléchine) archive at the International Institute of Social History in Amsterdam

 

 

Achrameev, I.

Folder 49 (1928)

AKHROMEEV Ivan Alekseevich

“Peasant. Arrested a long time ago, he was finally banished to Ust-Syssolsk in the Kem district of Siberia. Recent reports claim that he has lost his mind.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

 

 

Adov

Folder 49 (1929)

ADOV Sergei Ivanovich (1901 -?).

Anarchist. Student. Arrested in Petrograd 10.4.1924. In June 1924 sentenced to 3 years in the camps from the end of June 1924 was contained in Solovki camp special designation. In 1927 exiled to Narym, where he stayed, and at the end of 1930 was working. Further fate is unknown. - NIPTS Memorial.

Sergei Ivanovich Adov was sentenced on May 25 1949 by a Special Commission of the MGB to a term of exile in the town of Igarka, Krasnoyarsk Krai (Siberia). (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

 

 

Andina, A.I. (Šura). 

Folder 49 (1929, 1930.)

ANDINA Aleksandra (Shura) Ivanovna

Anarchist-communist. Worker. In October 1927 sentenced to 3 years in Irbit. In 1930 released, sentenced to restricted residence “minus 6” [forbidden to settle in the six largest cities of the Soviet Union], settled in Orenburg. Further fate is unknown. - NIPTS Memorial.

 

 

 

Artemenko, Kostja. 

Folder 49 (1929-1932.)

ARTEMENKO Konstantin 

Anarchist. Worker. For participation in the anarchist movement exiled for three years in Narymsky region, where in 1926-27 worked as a teacher, having credibility among local farmers. Conducted anarchist propaganda, including explaining and criticizing the Soviet legislation, which threatened to arrest in 1927. After his release from exile (1930) received a minus  6, settled in Tula. Further fate is unknown. - NIPTS Memorial.

 
 

Badin, A. and M.

Folder 50 (1929-1932 and n.d.) 

BADIN Aleksandr; BADIN Mikhail Ivanovich

Both anarchist students, brothers. Aleksander was a member of the Northern federation of anarchist-communists. Both sentenced to three years in the Urals, and exiled by the end of 1930. - NIPTS Memorial.

Aleksandr Badin (1903–1938) was an anarchist from the early 1920s and served terms of exile in Siberia starting in 1927. He was shot on October 29 1938 in Irkutsk. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

 

 

Baranov, V.I.

Folder 50 (1933.) 

Not identified.

 

 

Barmaš, V.

Folder 50 (1933.)

BARMASH Vladimir Vladimirovich (1879 -?)

Well-known anarchist, had been sentenced to death under the Tsar. Mainly active in Mocow, but also worked with the Makhnovists. Under the Bolsheviks was imprisoned or exiled in Butrirky, Verkhne-Uralsk, Kostroma, Yenisseisk, Suzdal.

 

 

Baron, A.

Folder 50 (1929-1931, 1933 and n.d.)

BARON [real name - Kantorovich] Aron Davidovich [1891, Kiev - 1937 (1938?)].

“Worker. Anarchist for many a long year, he was a victim of persecution under the tsar, was exiled and fled to America where he played an active part in the labour and revolutionary movement. When the revolution started in 1917, he returned to Russia where, as an anarchist, he took part in a range of revolutionary activities. In November 1920 he was arrested in Kharkov by the Bolsheviks, was locked up in the Cheka's 'internal prison' in Moscow and then committed to the Butyrki prison.

 

"After some incidents in Butyrki, he was removed to the prison in Orel. On several occasions he mounted a hunger strike and served a year and a half in various political prisons (Yaroslavl, Vladimir, etc.) and was finally brought back to Kharkov in 1922 where he was sentenced by the Ukrainian Central Executive Committee to be banished from the country, without any right of return to Russia. He was released to give him time to prepare to leave but when he reported back to the GPU to collect his passport, he was rearrested. In protest he mounted a hunger strike, which was no impediment to his being sentenced administratively (and in the absence of of a trial) to three years' detention in the Pertominsk camp. In 1923 he was moved with other anarchists to the Solovki Islands where he came down with a serious eye disease. Having served his sentence in Solovki, Baron was banished by administrative order to Biysk, a town in the province of Altaï in Siberia. In 1925, he was rearrested for having corresponded with comrades abroad and dispatched to an even remoter location, Karasino, a tiny hamlet in the Turovkhansi district, where the post arrives only three times a year.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

 

 

 

Batura, A.I.

Folder 50 (1929-1931 and n.d.)

BATURA Aleksandr Ivanovich

Had been deported from America. Imprisoned on Solovki. Exiled for 3 years in Siberia. By the end of 1930 released, received a "minus 6", settled in Dnepropetrovsk. Further fate is unknown. - NIPTS Memorial.

 

See Guillotine at work p.569 for letter from A.I. Baturo to “Golos Truzhenika” (organ of the Russian section of the IWW), from exile in Slobodsk, Viatka province: “In 1924, as you know, I was deported from America as an ‘undesirable element’ for the bourgeoisie.”

 
 

Beljaev, N.

Folder 51 (1928, 1929 and n.d.)

BELYAEV Nikolai (Nikita) Mikhailovich (1898 - 13.08.1937)

“Workman. Imprisoned as early as 1921 for his libertarian beliefs. Having served his time in prison, he was then exiled to Arkhangel. Rearrested in 1926 for having corresponded with anarchists abroad, he was deported to Kysl-Orda (Turkestan) where he presently resides. Arrested again on 2 October 1927.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

 

 

Berezovskij, D.E.

Folder 51 (1931, 1933 and n.d.)

BEREZOVSKY Dmitry (presumably)

 

 

Bljumin, L.

Folder 51 (1930-1934 and n.d.)

BLYUMIN Lev Lazarevich

He was arrested, served 3 years in the special-purpose Solovetsky camp, then sentenced to 3 years in exile. By the end of 1930 in exile in the Urals, gravely ill. Further fate is unknown. - NIPTS Memorial.

 

 

Borovikov, Aleksej P.

Folder 52 (1932, 1933.)

BOROVIKOV Aleksei Petrovich

“A. Borovikov, member of the Anarchist Communist group of Vladivostok … active participant in the rebel peasant campaign against the Whites, during 1918-1922” – Guillotine at Work, p561.

 

By the end of 1930 was imprisoned in the special-purpose Solovetsky camp. Further fate is unknown. - NIPTS Memorial.

 

 

 

Borovoj.

Folder 52 (1931.)

BOROVOY Aleksei Alekseevich (30.10.1875 - 21.11.1935)

Major Russian anarchist. See biography in KSL: Bulletin of the Kate Sharpley Library, n.55-56 via http://www.katesharpleylibrary.net/jsxmq1 

 

 

Bosinova, R. and E.

Folder 52 (1931-1933 and n.d.)

Not identified.

 

 

Bučiarelli, Gvido.

Folder 52 (1934.)

Bucciarelli, Guido (1901-?)

Bricklayer born in Modena on 12 August 1901: parents were Diego Bucciarelli and Candida Strozzi. He was involved in the agitations of the "two red years". In the latter half of 1920 he joined an anarchist group. [With Renzo Cavani, Luigi Evangelisti, Aldo Gilioli, etc. he served on the antifascist Anarchist Action Committee in Modena] After the killing of the fascist Gino Tabaroni, Bucciarelli and Cavani decided to flee Italy and by a roundabout route [they left Modena by train the night Cavani shot Tabaroni dead and were in Munich the following day] ended up in Odessa in the USSR.  There they met up with Evangelisti but whereas Cavani and Evangelisti headed for France, Bucciarelli stayed in the USSR. Reports on his stay in the USSR are few and sometimes contradictory. In 1928 it transpired he was in Moscow but he was then reported to be in Novorossisk on the Black Sea, where - according to the Italian Embassy - he was working in a machine shop and engaged in "communist propaganda". In 1933 he was arrested in Teodossia by the political police: the arrest was reported by the Embassy for one, which briefed the authorities back in Italy that Bucciarelli "appears to have been arrested for anarchist propaganda and to have been freed from jail recently." In 1935 he was in the Crimea, in Simferopol, working as manager of the People's Commissariat for Agriculture's vehicle repair shop. It turns out he had married a Soviet citizen and fathered a son. The following year [1938], during the "stalinist great terror" he was picked up for "counter-revolutionary activity", sent to a Gulag and died there on some unspecified date.

 

Trans PS (thanks)

Source: http://www.anarchismodenese.altervista.org/pages/biografie/bucciarelli.htm

 

 

Bulyčov.

Folder 52 (1931.)

BULYCHEV NG (presumably)

Nikolai Gordeyevich Bulychev (1895 – after 1937), better known under the pseudonym "N. Otverzhennyi", was active in the anarchist movement during the Civil War and throughout the 1920s. A well known speaker and journalist, he worked on various anarchist publications. On November 15 1937 in Alma-Ata an NKVD troika sentenced him to a term of 10 years of "deprivation of freedom". He died in the camps some time after 1937. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

 

 

Bunin, Z.I.

Folder 52 (1927-1929, 1932, 1933 and n.d.)

Not identified.

 

 

Chažinskij (Petr Reznikov), E.A.

Folder 53 (1934.)

Chazhinsky (Petr Reznikov), E.A. Not identified.

 

 

Chudolej, V.

Folder 53 (1933, 1934.)

KHUDOLEY (Khudoley-Gradin) Vladimir Sergeevich

Karelin group. Arrested for aiding prisoners? Imprisoned/Exiled in Suzdal and Altai.

 

 

Cigel'man, E.V.

Folder 53 (1933 and n.d.)

TSIGELMAN or ZIGELMANN Efim. “Painter and decorator. Arrested for having had dealings with anarchist friends abroad. Served three years' imprisonment in Solovki. And was then banished to Berdyansk where he remains at present.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

 

 

Cojrif, Dina.

Folder 53 (1929)

TSOYRIF (Tsoyriv) Dina Isakovna (1900-?)

Exiled to Saratov, deprived of work (1929) Guillotine at Work p.588. Wife of Viktorov, Nikolai.

 

 

 

Cukerman,

Folder 53 (1932.)

TSUKERMAN Moses Abramovich [ZUCKERMANN Moshe] (1898 -?)

Workman arrested in Moscow towards the end of 1922 and administratively banished for three years to Solovki as an anarchist. He mounted several hunger strikes, lasting from seven to thirteen days. Contracted malaria and an intestinal infection. He was transferred from the Solovki islands to the cellular political prison in Verkhne-Uralsk (Siberia) where he remained until his term expired in 1925. Given his state of health, he was placed in the prison infirmary where he underwent an operation. Immediately after this, while still weak and ailing, he was administratively banished for a three year period to the village of Kolpatchevo [Kolpashevo] in Siberia. Although still very ill, he was taken there in stages, which required him to make a long, exacting three month journey.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

On March 14 1929 Moisey Abramovich Tsukerman appeared before a commission charged with purging the state organs of the Tomsk Region. The minutes of the session recorded the following information about Tsukerman. He was born in 1898 into a family of colonists. Prior to 1918 he worked in a factory in Odessa. In 1918 he served in the Red Guard. In 1919 he belonged to partisan units operating against Yudenich. In 1922 he was arrested by the GPU and exiled to Narymsky Krai for being an anarcho-syndicalist. Upon completion of his sentence in October 1927, he arrived in Tomsk and found work as an accountant for Leszar (state forestry trust). The commission resolved to dismiss Tsukerman from his job, but to "not object" to his working in other Soviet institutions, so long as he was not dealing with the peasantry. [GATO (State Archive of Tomsk Oblast), F. P-435, Op. 1, D.24, L. 11–16.]

 

 

Čekmasova, Lena.

Folder 53 (1928-1930.)

CHEKMASOVA Elena Mikhailovna (1895 -?)

Imprisoned in Pertominsk and Solovki. Carried out a hunger strike. Fleshin met her in Arkhangelsk. (see Letters from Russian Prisons p.179)

 

 

Čučkov, Sergej.

Folder 53 (1929, 1930 and n.d.)

Chuchkov, Sergei. Not identified. A Chuchkov, S. (explicitly identified as a woman anarchist) was reported transferred from Ukhta to Izhma (see The Guillotine at Work p.575)

 

 

Darjušin, E.I.

Folder 54 (1930, 1931, 1933 and n.d.)

DARYUSHIN Yegor Ivanovich (ca. 1897 -?)

Anarcho-mystic.

 

 

Dolinskij, Efim O.

Folder 54 (1929-1931, 1933, 1934 and n.d.)

DOLINSKY Yefim O.

Exiled to the province of Turkestan (south-west Siberia) in January 1924. He was arrested there with a number of other comrades in December the same year. Currently in the cellular political prison in Verkhne-Uralsk.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

 

 

Egorov, Vladimir N.

Folder 54 (1929, 1932, 1933) (also: poems).

EGOROV Vladimir (also referred to as YEGOROV.)

Exiled or imprisoned in Yenisseisk, Tiumen, Verkhne-Uralsk.

 

 

Federmeer, Kl.

Folder 55 (1933.)

FEDERMEER [Federnir] Klara Abramovna

Exiled Narym. Carried out a hunger strike in 1927 for the right to be in the same prison as her husband (AV Pokrovsky).

 

 

Fedorov, A.I.

Folder 55 (1930-1932.)

Could be FEDOROV Aleksandr (Ivanovich?) or FEDOROV Aleksandr Ilich (ca. 1903 -?) from Ufa province.

 

 

Fisun, Petr A.

Folder 55 (1929-1933 and n.d.)

FIZUN (Fisun) Petr Alekseevich

“In the village Ust-Kulom, District of Komy, there was arrested in the beginning of the year the exile Petr A. Fissun. Together with him were also arrested a number of other exiles, and all of them were sent to prison of Ust-Sissolsk. They were accused of ‘organising anti-Soviet propaganda’, but though no proof could be found to substantiate the charge they are still kept in prison. Comrade Fissun, a university student, was originally exiled for showing too much interest in social problems.” – “Bulletin of the Relief Fund of the International Working Men’s Association for Anarchists and Anarcho-syndicalists imprisoned and exiled in Russia” November 1931.

 

 

Futerfas, Natan Ja.

Folder 55 (1931-1934.)

FUTERFAS Natan. In Memorial list, no other information.

Natan Yakovlevich Futerfas (1896–1937) belonged to anarchist groups in Moscow during the Civil War. He chaired the organizing committee of the "All-Russian Federation of Esperantists" (1918–1924), which brought together supporters of anarchists in the Esperantist milieu. Starting in 1924, he was arrested on at least four occasions and found himself in prisons or in exile most of the time. Meanwhile, he continued to take part in the anarchist movement by, for example, being one of the leaders of the "Petrograd Group of Anarcho-Syndicalists" (1927) and by joining groups of exiled anarchists in the Narymsky district and in Arkhangelsk. It was in the latter city that he was shot on October 27 1937. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

 

Gajdovskij, Sergej

Folder 56 (1929-1932 and n.d.)

GAYDOVSKY Sergei.

An Esperantist, arrested with his wife.

 

 

Geksel'man, Jakov M.

Folder 56 (1930-1933 and n.d.)

GEKSELMAN Yakov Maksimovich

In Memorial list, no other information: presumably brother and sister.

 

 

Geksel'man, Manja.

Folder 56 (1929-1931 and n.d.)

GEKSELMAN Maria Maksimovna

In Memorial list, no other information: presumably brother and sister.

 

 

Gerasimčik, P.

Folder 56 (1930-1934.)

GERASIMCHUK Pavel Petrovich (ca. 1891 -?)

From Petrograd, ex-Golos Truda. Imprisoned in Suzdal, then exiled in Beresov. (see The Guillotine at Work p.596)

 

 

Gerasimov, Efim.

Folder 56 (1929-1933.)

GERASIMOV Yefim Ivanovich

Upper Uralsk, Narim, Ulianovsk.

 

 

Golubev, F.N.

Folder 56 (1931-1933.)

GOLUBEV Fyodor (Feodosii) Nikolaevich (1899 -?)

Anarcho-syndicalist

 

 

Golubev, V.I.

Folder 57 (1931.)

GOLUBEV Vasily Ivanovich

In Memorial list, no other information.

 

 

Gomenik, Aleksandr E.

Folder 57 (1929, 1930 and n.d.)

Transferred from Tobolsk to Surgut. Suffering from tuberculosis. (see The Guillotine at Work p.580)

 

 

 

Grinberg (Šornik), Riva K.

Folder 57 (1930-1932.)

GRINBERG

In Memorial list, no other information.

 

 

Ilovajskij, Michail S.

Folder 57 (1929-1933 and n.d.)

ILOVAYSKY (Kaydanov, Ilovaysky-Kaydanov)

In Memorial list, no other information.

 

 

 

Izdebskaja, Sonja A.

Folder 57 (1928-1932 and n.d.)

IZDEBSKAYA Sonya Aleksandrovna 

Despite the variation of first name, presumably: “ISEBSKAYA (Sofia). - Doctor. Imprisoned as an anarchist under the tsar. Arrested in Petrograd by the Bolsheviks in the summer of 1926. Administratively banished to the Narym district of Siberia for three years.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

 

 

Jakovleva, Vera P.

Folder 57 (1929, 1930 and n.d.)

YAKOVLEVA Vera Pavlovna (1894 -?)

“having completed her sentence in Tobolsk has now been again exiled to the village of Samarovo, Northern Siberia” (see The Guillotine at Work p.581)

 

 

Kalačev, Andrej N.

Folder 58 (1930, 1931, 1934.)

KALACHEV Andrei Nikolaevich (ca. 1901 -?)

Anarchist-communist from Ufa province. In Memorial list.

Andrey Nikolayevich Kalachev (1900–1937), an anarcho-communist from 1920, was active in the anarchist movement in the city of Ufa and villages of Ufimskaya gubernia and the Bashskirskaya ASSR as an organizer and propagandist. He became the director of a peasant commune. After 1920 he was frequently arrested and served at least four years in camps and at least six years of exile. He was one of several anarchists, members of a group of exiles, shot in Kustanay (Kazakhstan) on November 2 1937. (Research by A. Dubovik.)

 

 

 

Kirillov, F.P.

Folder 58 (1929, 1930.)

Not identified.

 

 

Kolemasov, A.A.

Folder 58 (1929-1934 and n.d)

KOLMASOV (Kolemasov) Aleksandr Alekseevich

“The Anarchist Kolomasov, sailor and student in Moscow, who was lately in exile in Aktubinsk, has been  arrested on the charge of an alleged attempt to escape and sent to prison for three years” (see The Guillotine at Work p.560)

 

 

Konse, Anatol' I.

Folder 58 (1933, 1934.)

KONSE-KUNTSEVICH [Konse-Kuntsevich] Anatoly (Anatole) Iosifovich (1897 -?)

In Memorial list, no other information.

 

 

Kosov, V.F.

Folder 58 (1933 and n.d.)

KOSOV Vasily?

Imprisoned or exiled in Verkhne-Uralsk, Kudimkor, Sverdlovsk.

Vasily Fedorovich Kosov (1897–1937) joined a group of anarcho-syndicalists in Rostov-on-Don in the early 1920s. After his arrest in 1924 he was sent first to the Solovetsky concentration camps and then to exile in the Urals, where he continued to participate in the anarchist movement. In late 1933 he was arrested in Saratov for attempting to organize an underground group, and exiled to Kazakhstan. On February 19 1937 he and other members of a group of exiled anarchists were arrested; they were all shot on November 2 1937 in Kustanay (Kazakhstan). (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

 

 

Krasavčikov, F.

Folder 59 (1929, 1930.)

KRASAVCHIKOV (Krasavchik) Fedor Artemevich (Andreevich) (Artemovich) (ca. 1899 -?)

Anarchist since 1917. In Solovetzky. Bulletin of the ARC 1

 

 

Krasavin, Sergej A.

Folder 59 (1929-1932.)

KRASAVIN Sergei Anatolievich

Imprisoned or exiled in Obdorsk, Surgut, Beresov.

 

 

Kruglov, Ivan V.

Folder 59 (1928-1930, 1933, 1934 and n.d.)

KRUGLOV Ivan Vasilevich

“Our comrade Ivan V. Kruglov, who had been arrested in February and imprisoned in Sverdlovsk, has now been condemned to 3 years in the Verkhne-Ouralsk [-Uralsk] polit-isolator. Kruglov was a student at the Moscow University, and he has been repeatedly arrested for his unorthodox political opinions. We are informed that Kruglov is accused of ‘an attempt at terrorism’, the most absurd charge that could possibly be made under the given circumstances. For Kruglov was arrested in his exile in Surgur, in the Ural district, one of the most desolate places where even the most passionate terrorist could find no active appliaction. But some charge was needed to bury the keen mentality of the incorruptible student in the solitary of the political prison.” – “Bulletin of the Relief Fund of the International Working Men’s Association for Anarchists and Anarcho-syndicalists imprisoned and exiled in Russia” November 1931.

 

 

Kumanov-Rach, Al'bert V.

Folder 60-61 (1929-1932, 1934 and n.d.)

KUMANOV (Rakh, Rakh-Kumanov) Albert Viktorovich

“Kumanov has suffered Bolshevik persecution almost uninterruptedly during the last 10 years. He has spent five years in the Solovki. … [now] confined in some secret prison again, and the place of their imprisonment is kept secret.”  (see The Guillotine at Work p.600.)

 

 

Kuprijanov.

Folder 62 (1932.)

Presumably the KUPRIYANOV in the memorial list. Reported as being in the Turukhan district – “Bulletin of the Relief Fund of the International Working Men’s Association for Anarchists and Anarcho-syndicalists imprisoned and exiled in Russia” November 1931.

 

 

Kurganskaja, Polja.

Folder 62 (1928, 1929 and n.d.)

KURGANSKAYA Polina (Apolina) Arnoldovna (1895 - 1929)

“Working woman. After having been arrested and shuttled for years from prison to prison (the Solovki Islands, among others), she was banished to Tula where she lives with her two children in the direst circumstances. Has come down with a serious illness.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

 

 

Lebedev, L.

Folder 63 (1930, 1931.)

LEBEDEV Leonid Yakovlevich (1900 -?)

“Workman. Arrested at the Kharkov anarchist congress in November 1920. For five years he was shifted from prison to prison before finishing up in the Solovki concentration camp. He was then dispatched to Kolpatchevo, a hamlet in the Narym district (Siberia) where he is at present, gravely ill and in need of an operation.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

Lebedev was one of the prisoners shot and wounded on 19 December 1923, in Solovki. See Letters from Russian Prisons p.203, 208

 

 

Levandovskij, Aleksandr.

Folder 63 (1928-1934 and n.d.)

LEVANDOVSKY Aleksandr

“intellectual, well known in esperantist circles. Arrested with his wife in Saratov in 1924. Now in exile in Obdorsk, Uralsk District, Siberia.”  (see The Guillotine at Work p.565.)

 

 

Liliental', Alja.

Folder 63 (1929-1931.)

LILIENTAL Alla

“Young woman comrade arrested last October in Leningrad. It has been definitely established now that the only charge against her is ‘connection with people in foreign countries’. Those ‘connections’ consisted of the most innocent correspondence with personal fiends in France and America.” (see The Guillotine at Work p.576.)

 

 

Linčevskij, Sonja and David.

Folder 63 (1930-1934 and n.d.)

LINCHEVSKY David [and Sonya]

From Kiev. They had three children. He refused military service and was exiled to Arkhangel. (see The Guillotine at Work p.600.)

 

 

Lipovetskij, Boris.

Folder 64 (1929, 1931, 1932 and n.d.)

LIPOVETSKY Boris E. (1889 -?)

Exiled in Uralsk and Dnepropetrovsk.

 

 

Ljach, M.F.

Folder 64 (1929-1932 and n.d )

LYAKH Milica Fedorovna

“Arrested in Moscow in the summer of 1920 as an anarchist. Administratively banished to the Pertominsk concentration camp (northern Russia) for three years and later transferred to the Solovki Islands. Then held in the cellular political prison of Verkhne-Uralsk. Her term served, around the end of 1925, Liakh was banished again to Veyliki-Ustiug in the province of Seyveyro-Dvinsk (north-west Russia). On several occasions she went on hunger strike, one of them lasting for eighteen days, which has presently left her health in a worrying state.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926. Later went deaf (see The Guillotine at Work p.591.)

 

 

Machov, V.D.

Folder 65 (1929-1933.)

MAKHOV Vasily Dmitrievich (1889-?)

Presumably the “Makhov - anarchist workman” reported in Solovki, Comrades! Help for revolutionaries jailed in Russia! Published in A Comuna (Oporto) sometime in 1926. List reproduced in Edgar Rodrigues A resistência anarco-sindicalista à ditadura. Portugal 1922-1929 (Editora Sementeira, Lisbon 1981) pp. 292-296

Exiled to Parabel, Tomsk district.

Vasily Dmitrievich Makhov (1889–1937) took part in the revolutionary movement from an early age as a member of the Socialist-Revolutionary Party. In 1917 he switched to the anarchists and became a follower and friend of Lev Chorny. During the Civil War he was arrested several times by the Chekists and, starting in 1921, spent almost 10 years in prisons and concentration camps. In the early 1930s he was part of the anarchist underground in Ukraine, which resulted in more prison and exile. On November 2 1937 he was shot in Kustanay (Kazakhstan) along with several other anarchists, members of a local group of political exiles. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

 

 

Makarov, Vasilij N.

Folder 65 (1931, 1932 and n.d.)

Is this MAKAROV Nikolai Vasilevich (ca. 1889-?)? The Memorial list has another MAKAROV (no first name given). The Guillotine at Work reports Vasily Makarov being sentenced to three years exile in Obdorsk, and dying there (p596, 602).

 

 

Maksimov, Aleksej V.

Folder 65 (1928-1931, 1933 and n.d.)

MAKSIMOV Alexei Vasilevich (1903-?). Anarcho-syndicalist.

Update: Alexei Vasilevich Maksimov (1903–1937), an anarcho-syndicalist from the early 1920s, was arrested in 1924 for belonging to an anarchist circle of Petrograd students. He served three years in a Solvetsky concentration camp. In 1927–1933 he was exiled to the Northern Urals. During this period he kept busy with regional historical, archeological and geological research, and contributed his efforts to the Northern Urals Expedition (1927) and the Zoological Museum of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR. At the same time, he maintained contacts with the anarchist emigration and with other comrades in exile. He was shot in Ufa on December 25 1937. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

 

 

Malinovskij, A.

Folder 65 (1932.)

MALINOVSKY.

Aleksei Malinovsky exiled to Vologda (see The Guillotine at Work p.597.)

 

 

Michajlov, Vladimir A.

Folder 65 (1930-1933 and n.d.)

MIKHAILOV Vladimir Andreevich

Mikhailov (no first name) reported at Ufa and Orel. (see The Guillotine at Work 592, 601)

 

 

Michal'kov, Michail P.

Folder 65 (1929-1932.)

MIKHALKOV Mikhail

Sent to Stcheglovsk. (see The Guillotine at Work p.596.)

 

 

Naumov, Aleksandr S.

Folder 66 (1930-1932 and n.d.)

NAUMOV Aleksandr Stepanovich

Ex-Komsomol, came to anarchist ideas independently. Exiled and imprisoned in Tobolsk, Obdorsk, Solovki, Kagarsk and died in Tomsk. Autobiographical letter in The Guillotine at Work p.602-607.

 

 

Nej-Nejkrug, M.M.

Folder 66 (1929-1933.)

NEY-NEYKRUG Mikhail Borisovich (Mironovich? Markovic?)

“After having been imprisoned for nine years in the Butirky and the Solovky, has been sent for 3 years to Surgut, in the Ural District.” – “Bulletin of the Relief Fund of the International Working Men’s Association for Anarchists and Anarcho-syndicalists imprisoned and exiled in Russia” November-December 1930.

 

 

Orlov, K.P.

Folder 66 (1929)

ORLOV Konstantin

Presumably the Orlov who “having finished his term of exile in Novorossiysk, was arrested and imprisoned in Sverdlovsk and shortly afterwards again sent, for unknown reasons, to Tobolsk.” (see The Guillotine at Work p.574.)

 

 

Pankrat'ev, A.

Folder 66 (1929, 1930.)

Or Pankratov, Artem “Nikolai Beliaev and Artyom Pankratov, anarchists in exile at Kizil Orda, arrested when they address a meeting and protest about an airbase being named after Sacco and Vanzetti. They are exiled to Siberia.” (Chronology)

 

 

Panfilov, M.S.

Folder 66 (N.d.)

Not identified

 

 

Petrosova, Marija.

Folder 67 (1933.)

PETROSOVA [Potresova] Maria Vasilyevna (Vartanovna, Varshanovna) (1899 - not before 1956)

“was not released after she completed her term in Yeniseisk, Siberia. Instead she was given another three years in the same place.” (see The Guillotine at Work p.602.)

Maria Vartanovna Petrosova, aka Maria Vasilyevna Potresova, was born on March 16 1893 in Akhaltsikhe, Georgia. She took part in the revolutionary movement still in tsarist times. In 1917 she joined the anarcho-communists and during the civil war was an active participant of the "Saratov Group of Anarcho-Communists". At the end of the 1920s, together with her husband V. V. Barmash, she engaged in the illegal activities of Moscow supporters of the "Platform" of P. A. Arshinov and N. I. Makhno. In the mid-1930s she joined the anarchist group of A. D. Baron in Orel. Arrested seven times by the Soviet government, she served seven years in camps and 22 years of exile. She survived until at least 1957. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

 

 

Pikunov, Viktor.

Folder 67 (1931, 1932 and n.d.)

PIKUNOV Victor Sergeevich ( - 12.06.1984)

Exiled to Samravo (Samarovo?) – “Bulletin of the Relief Fund of the International Working Men’s Association for Anarchists and Anarcho-syndicalists imprisoned and exiled in Russia” November 1931.

Victor Sergeevich Pikunov (27.12.1900 – 12.06.1984) was born in the city of Sergiyev Posad near Moscow. After finishing his gymnasium studies in 1918, he joined the Red Army and served four years; upon being demobilized he entered a program of veterinary medicine, but had to withdraw for lack of financial support. He was an anarchist from 1922 and took part in creating and leading legal and underground anarchist circles in Moscow and the surrounding region. He spent two years on the All-Union "most wanted" list before being arrested in late 1926. He served three years in a polit-isolator and three years of exile, during which he initiated many protest actions by political prisoners. After his release from exile, he worked as a casual labourer until he was able to complete a forestry course which allowed him to work in this field for many years, eventually retiring with a pension. In the late 1950s he collaborated in an unsuccessful attempt to resurrect the anarcho-mystical order. He remained an anarchist and anarcho-mystic till the end of his life. [Research by A. L. Nikitin, "Order of Russian Templars", Vol. 1 (Moscow, 2003); and A. V. Dubovik.]

 

 

Plotnikov, Timofej.

Folder 67 (1930, 1931.)

PLOTNIKOV Timofei Dmitrievich (1901-?)

Imprisoned in Solovki, exiled in Central Asia (see The Guillotine at Work p.588, 601.)

 

 

Pomjakova, Marija.

Folder 67 (1931 and n.d.)

Is this POLYAKOVA (Polyakova-Uskova) Maria?

“POLYAKOVA (Maria). - Student and later worker. Arrested in Leningrad on 8 February 1925 with 80 other workers and students, she was one of 15 of them sentenced to three years' imprisonment. Hers is a particularly interesting case. Initially she studied at the Faculty of Medicine in Moscow. After three yeas of studies, and believing that it was impossible to take part in the workers' movement without living the life of the proletariat, she first joined a Leningrad hospital as a nurse and then found a job in a factory. She protested at her conviction by going on hunger strike. She was dragged away, semi-naked, to Solovki. Before reaching there, at the last prison stop-over on the mainland, she was thrown in among the ordinary prisoners. She protested by mounting another hunger strike. Her gaolers stripped her and tossed her, dressed only in her shift, into the criminal barracks. Later, after she had been shuttled from prison to prison, she was finally dropped off in Khantaik village in the Turukhansk district of Siberia.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

 

 

Polozova, Tat'jana.

Folder 67 (1929, 1930 and n.d.)

POLOZOVA Tatiana Arsentevna (ca. 1894-?)

“Employee of the Golos Truda publishing house in Moscow. Arrested at the end of 1923 as a member of the Anarchist Prisoners' Aid Committee. Administratively sentenced to three years' detention in the Solovki Islands. Transferred from there to the cellular political prison in Verkhne-Uralsk and, when her time was up, to Tver.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

 

 

Postnikov, V.

Folder 67 (1929-1931.)

POSTNIKOV Vasily Matveevich         (1894-3.11.1937)

Exiled in Arkhangel and Yenisseisk. See “Bulletin of the Relief Fund of the International Working Men’s Association for Anarchists and Anarcho-syndicalists imprisoned and exiled in Russia” December 1928.

Vasily Matveevich Postnikov (1894–1937) was an anarcho-syndicalist from the mid-1910s. During the Civil War he helped to organize Red Guard detachments and established soviet power in Kungursky uyezd of Permskaya gubernia. In 1921 he organized an agricultural commune called "Rassvet" [Dawn] and enjoyed great influence among the peasants of Uralsky oblast. In 1924 Postnikov was arrested as one of the main leaders of the anarchist movement in the Urals. From this time on he began the long journey through prisons, camps, and exile. He was shot on November 3 1937 in Ufa. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

 

 

Rabinovič, Isaak.

Folder 68 (1934 and n.d.)

RABINOVICH Isaac Isaevich (nickname - "Fyodor", "Nikolai Pavlovich") (1884 -?)

 

 

Rabinovič, Lev A.

Folder 68 (1931-1934 and n.d.)

RABINOVICH Lev Abramovich

Exiled to Orel (see The Guillotine at Work p.597.)

 

 

Rachmankulova, Z.

Folder 68 (1931-1933 and n.d.)

RAKHMANKULOVA Zulia.

No further information.

 

 

Rakov, V.E.

Folder 68 (1929, 1931, 1932.)

Is this RAKOV Benjamin?: Petrograd student, exiled to Uralsk. (See Bulletin of the Joint Committee for the Defense of Revolutionists Imprisoned in Russia, November-December 1925.)

 

 

Razin, Stepan.

Folder 68 (1930-1933 and n.d.)

RAZIN Stepan Mikhailovich

Presumably the Razin exiled at Narym (three years) and then Tomsk (see The Guillotine at Work p.596).

 

 

Retovskij, Otto O.

Folder 68 (1930, 1933, 1934.)

RETOVSKY [Retkovsky, Rotovsky] Otto Ottovich

No further information.

Otto Ottovich Retovsky (1902–1938) led an underground anarchist group in Yusovka (Dontetsk) in the early 1920s. He was first arrested in 1924, served three years in prison and 11 years in exile. He collaborated with other exiled anarchists in Tashkent and Siberia, frequently engaging in hunger strikes and other acts of protest. In May 4 1938 he was shot after being convicted of starting a "counter-revolutionary anarcho-terrorist organization". (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

 

 

Rozova, Anja.

Folder 68 (1929, 1930.)

Rosova, Anna (or Anya)

“Comrade Anna Rosova, having concluded her term of exile in Nizhne-Zaimka, Siberia, was expecting her liberation. Instead, she was again arrested and sent to the Solovietsky Islands. Previous to her exile comrade Rosova had already served 3 years in the Solovky. Her treatment there was so brutal that she was compelled to protest with a hunger strike that lasted 43 days. Anna Rosova is a former Communist. Disillusioned with Bolshevikk methods and practices she had resigned from the party. That was the reason she was doomed to the Solovky the first time. Now she has again been imprisoned on that Devil’s Island, and together with her, her small child. – “Bulletin of the Relief Fund of the International Working Men’s Association for Anarchists and Anarcho-syndicalists imprisoned and exiled in Russia” November 1931.

 

 

Rubinskij, S.A.

Folder 68 (1933, 1934 and n.d.)

Presumably RUVIMSKY Samuel Aronovich (1905 -?)

Exiled at Minusinsk (see The Guillotine at Work p.580).

 

 

Sablin, Igor'.

Folder 69 (1932, 1933.)

SABLIN Igor Vladimirovich

Reported exiled in 1929. Later reported in Ufa. (see The Guillotine at Work p.589 and “Bulletin of the Relief Fund of the International Working Men’s Association for Anarchists and Anarcho-syndicalists imprisoned and exiled in Russia” November 1931).

 

 

Sacharov.

Folder 69 (1930, 1931.)

SAKHAROV Sergei

No further information.

 

 

Sadov.

Folder 69 (1930.)

SADOV Kirill

No further information.

 

 

Sall', Otto.

Folder 69 (1929, 1930.)

SALL Otto

No further information.

Update: Otto Ioganovich Sall' (1901–1938), a native of Estonia, was working as an assembler at the Leningrad Electro-Apparat plant in 1938 when he was arrested and charged under Article 58-6 of the Criminal Code (espionage). He was shot in Leningrad on May 5 1938. Officially he was described as "bespartiynyy" [non-party], often a euphemism for "anarchist".

 

 

Semin.

Folder 69 (1929 )

SEMIN Sergei Petrovich (ca. 1901-1930)

Anarcho-syndicalist. Imprisoned in Verkhne-Uralsk, exiled in Tver and Tashkent. Died of Tuberculosis. – “Bulletin of the Relief Fund of the International Working Men’s Association for Anarchists and Anarcho-syndicalists imprisoned and exiled in Russia” November-December 1930.

 

 

Sergeev, Viktor.

Folder 70 (1926, 1927, 1929, 1933 and n.d.)

SERGEEV Victor

“Arrested for having organised a peasant cooperative. Exiled to Arkhangel as an anarchist, he was then banished to an even more remote location in Tyumen for having corresponded with anarchists abroad.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

 

 

Sil'vestrov, N.G. "Medved".

Folder 71 (1930, 1931.)

SILVESTROV (Seliverstov) Nikolai Grigoryevich        (9.05.1896-3.11.1937)

Imprisoned in Solovki, afterwards sent to a polit-isolator. (see The Guillotine at Work p.599).

 

 

Slučevskij, I.

Folder 71 (1928)

SLUCHEVSKY Illarion

Exiled to Temezhbekskaya (Armavir district) (see The Guillotine at Work p.580).

 

 

Smoljakov, Aleksandr A.

Folder 71 (1929, 1930.)

SMOLYUKOV Aleksandr Aleksandrovich

Worker. Imprisoned in Tobolsk. (see The Guillotine at Work p.555, 566).

 

 

Solncev, Nikolaj.

Folder 71 (1929, 1930 and n.d.)

SOLNTSEV Nikolay Aleksandrovich (ca. 1893 -?)

“Teacher; arrested in Vologda, now in Beresov, Siberia” (see The Guillotine at Work p. 566).

Update: Nikolay Aleksandrovich Solntsev (1892 – ?) became an anarcho-communist in 1912, took part in the anarchist movement in Petersburg - Petrograd, and was a regular contributor and editor of the newspaper "Burevestnik" (1917–1918). He was arrested at the end of 1918 and exiled to Vologda, where he became one of the leaders of the Northern Federation of Anarcho-Communists in the early 1920s. During the 1920s and 1930s he was constantly subject to arrest and exile as an "incorrigible anarchist". On November 6 1941 a military tribunal in Kasimov (Ryazan oblast) sentenced him to 10 years in a concentration camp. His subsequent fate is unknown. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

 

 

Stepnaja, Dora.

Folder 71 (1927 and n.d )

STEPNAYA Dora Moiseevna (1897 -?)

 “Worker. Arrested and shuttled from prison to prison, ending up in Solovki with her little boy child. Later banished to Tula while seriously ill. Recently arrested again and banished to Arkhangel.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926. Died in Moscow (1932?) (see The Guillotine at Work p. 602).

 

 

Šapiro, Rachil'.

Folder 72 (1930, 1932, 1934.)

SHAPIRO Rachel Davydovna (1897 -?) [Memorial also list SHAPIRO Rachel Moiseevna (ca. 1897 -?)]

Exiled to Turkestan (see The Guillotine at Work p. 566).

[Some of the letters are not from her but from her son David (Dodek), born around 1918, whose father (Alexander Tanaroff or Sacha Piotr or Alexander Shapiro) went into exile in 1921, lived in Berllin and Paris and was the father of the mathematician Alexandre Grothendieck. See Winfried Scharlau, Who is Alexander Grothendieck, part I, publ. Books on Demand, 2011. - CIRA]

 

 

Šarbe Brjuchanov.

Folder 72 (1930, 1931 and n.d.)

SHARBE [Sherbe, Tarbe] (Bryukhanov, Sharbe-Bryukhanov) Evgeny Nikolaevich

Sent to Siberia after three years in the Solovki. – “Bulletin of the Relief Fund of the International Working Men’s Association for Anarchists and Anarcho-syndicalists imprisoned and exiled in Russia” November-December 1930.

Update: Evgeny Nikolaevich Sharbe-Bryukhanov (1896–1938) took part in the underground anarchist movement of the 1920s. Beginning in 1925, he served a sentence in the Solovetsky concentration camp, followed by terms of exile in Siberia. He was shot on October 28 1938 in Krasnoyarsk. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

 

 

Škol'nikov, Izja.

Folder 72 (1929-1934 and n.d.)

SHKOLNIKOV Iza (Isaac, (Izya, Tsezik, Ilya) Abramovich (?1893-?)

“Arrested in Moscow in 1921. Exiled to the Arkhangel district in 1922. Removed and banished to Tashkent (Turkestan). Removed again and transferred to prison in Tobolsk. Released and settled in Tobolsk. Recently he was moved to the Butyrki prison (Moscow). There, despite his alarming state of health, he was placed in a damp cell. He objected and asked for a different cell. After five months of fruitless requests, despairing of his cause, he decided to end it all by setting fire to himself. In which attempt he only half succeeded: he burned his clothes and inflicted atrocious burns on himself, especially his feet. Currently held in the cellular prison in Yaroslavl. Unable to walk without the aid of crutches.”  “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

 

 

Šlichter-Ichel'son (/V. Koljada(Poland)).

Folder 73 (1930-1934 and n.d.

SHLIKHTER

No further information.

 

 

Šljachovoj (Štjurmer), Anton.

Folder 74 (1930, 1931, 1933 and n.d.)

SHLYAKHOVSKY (Shlyakhovoy) Anton A. [His wife - Shtyurmer KA]

“Workman. Arrested in Kharkov in 1920. Deported for having corresponded with friends abroad. Rearrested in August 1926 on the same grounds and dispatched to the cellular political prison in Verkhne-Uralsk for three years.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

 

 

Šornik (Grinberg), Izrail' A.

Folder 74 (1927, 1929-1931, 1933, 1934 and n.d.)

SHORNIK Israel Abramovich

No further information.

 

 

Štjurmer (Šljachovoj), Kira.

Folder 74 (1931, 1933 and n.d .)

SHTYURMER Kira Arkadevna [Wife of SHLYAKHOVSKY]

“Arrested in Petrograd, she was imprisoned in the Verkhne-Uralsk cellular political prison for three years.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926. Student. Also exiled to Arkhangel.

Update: Kira Arkadevna Shtyurmer (1902–1937) was from the aristocracy, the niece or grand-niece of a tsarist minister. She supported the revolution and became an anarchist in 1920 (her brother Georgiy was also an anarchist). The rest of her life was spent mostly in prison or exile until she was shot on November 13 1937. (Research by A. Dubovik.)

 

 

Šul'man, Raja V.

Folder 74 (1929-1934 and n.d.)

SHULMAN Raya

“Student arrested in Petrograd on 8 February 1925 at a meeting to commemorate Kropotkin. She was "sentenced" by administrative order to prison and locked up in Verkhne-Uralsk. Following the ghastly violence inflicted upon the inmates of that prison in 1926, Raya show signs of mental illness. Thanks to her relatives's connections with leading Bolsheviks, authorisation was secured for the patient to be removed to a Moscow hospital under GPU watch. According to the latest reports, the GPU has just decided that Shulmann, now recovered, is to be returned to prison. En route this comrade succumbed to two mental breakdowns.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

 

 

Tarasjuk, Ajzik G.

Folder 75 (1929-1933 and n.d.)

Not identified.

Update: Ajzek Gershevich Tarasjuk (1897 – ?) joined the anarchist movement in 1917–1918. During the Civil War he was active in the anarchist underground in Odessa against the Whites, and then against the Soviet authorities. He was arrested during the liquidation of the Odessa anarchist groups in 1929. He served terms of exile in the North, in Voronezh, and in Kustana (Kazakhstan), while continuing to take part in anarchist activities. He was arrested again in 1934 and in 1937. On December 27 1937, in Chimkent (Kazakhstan), he received a 10 year sentence from a NKVD troika. His subsequent fate is unknown. (Research by A. V. Dubovik and V. A. Savchenko.)

 

 

Tarasjuk-Kabas', I.

Folder 75 (1929, 1930, 1932-1934.)

KABAS (Tarasyuk, Kabas-Tarasyuk, Tarasyuk-Kabas) Ivan Vasilevich (1893 -?)

 “Workman. Arrested in Kharkov in November 1920 and, after several hunger strikes and transfers from prison to prison, he was assigned administratively to the Kholmogor concentration camp for two years. In the wake of the beatings inflicted upon the anarchists there in November 1922 he was removed to the Pertominsk camp. Freed after serving out his term, he was rearrested after a short time and banished to Briansk where he was arrested again and dispatched to Arkhangelsk. In 1926 he was arrested yet again for having corresponded with friends abroad and locked up in Petropavlovsk.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

 

 

Tarlovskij, Gerasim O.

Folder 75 (1933, 1934.)

TARLOVSKY Gerasim Osipovich (Iosifovich) (1897 -?)

After five years hard labour in Solovki, sentenced to three years exile in Arkhangel. – “Bulletin of the Relief Fund of the International Working Men’s Association for Anarchists and Anarcho-syndicalists imprisoned and exiled in Russia” November-December 1930.

 

 

Tubisman, B.I.(Betja).

Folder 75 (1930, 1931, 1931, 1934 and n.d.)

TUBISMAN [Tubasman] Bertha Izrailevna (1886-?)

Exiled in Voronezh (see The Guillotine at Work p. 597).

 

 

Tumanov, Nikolaj M.

Folder 75 (1932-1934 and n.d.)

TUMANOV Nikolay Matveevich (1902-not earlier than November 1937)

Imprisoned in Solovki (see The Guillotine at Work p. 588).

Nikolai Matveevich Tumanov (1902–1937) joined an anarcho-syndicalist group in Kineshma (Ivanovo-Voznesensk province) in the early 1920s. He was arrested several times, starting in 1924, and spent the rest of his life in prisons, camps, or exile, including Solovki. On November 2 1937 he was shot in Kustanay (Kazakhstan) along with several other exiled anarchists. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

 

 

Tužilkin, Sergej S.

Folder 75 (1934. )

TUZHILKIN Sergei Sergeevich (1909 -? 20.07.1938)

“A group of 50 anarchists is smashed at Chelyabinsk. It has an underground printshop and published anarchist texts, mostly foreign translations, and has contacts with anarchists outside the USSR. Sergei Tujilkin, a young electrician, ran the printshop. He gets 5 years in the political isolator at Verkhne-Uralsk. He tells Ciliga that the anarchists are very active and had succeeded in founding an efficient organisation.” (Chronology). See also  Ciliga’s “The Russian Enigma” p196.

 

 

Uskov, Pavel.

Folder 76 (1930.)

USKOV Pavel

“Workman. Arrested as an anarchist in Petrograd in February 1925. Following a six day hunger strike, which he was obliged to give up following brutality and beatings from the warders, he was administratively dispatched for three years to the Khantaik hamlet in the Turukhansk district (Siberia).” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

 

 

Vajnberg, Leva.

Folder 76 (1930-1932 and n.d.)

VAYNBERG L. B.

“L.B. Weinberg, a comrade from Odessa, has recently been exiled to the small village of Samarovo in the Ural District. He was the sole support of his old mother, and now we learn that she died of starvation.” – “Bulletin of the Relief Fund of the International Working Men’s Association for Anarchists and Anarcho-syndicalists imprisoned and exiled in Russia” November-December 1930.

Update: Lev Bentsionovich Vaynberg (1895–1937) took part in the underground anarchist movement in Odessa in the 1920s. Arrested in 1929, he served a term of exile in the Northern Urals and in Voronezh, where he was again arrested in 1934 for belonging to a group led by Aron Baron. From 1936 he was found in the Dalstroy camps, where he was shot on November 27 1937. (Research by A. Dubovik.)

 

 

Vajnštejn, Aron A.

Folder 76 (1930-1934.)

VAYNSHTEYN Aron

Exiled in Orel (see The Guillotine at Work p. 597).

Update: Aron Abramovich Vaynshteyn (1891–1938) became an anarchist still in tsarist times, emigrated to the USA, and returned to Ukraine after the Revolution to carry on an underground struggle against the Whites. After the civil war ended, he was arrested numerous times for anti-soviet activity. He was shot at Kazan on January 9 1938. (Research by A. Dubovik.)

 

 

Varšavskij, N.I.

Folder 76 (1932, 1933.)

VARSHAVSKY Noah (Ionya) Ilich (1892-not before 1955)

“The anarchist Jonas Warchawski secretly edits and distributes pamphlets about the hypocrisy of the Soviet regime in taking up Sacco and Vanzetti as a cause whilst persecuting anarchists at home. He is arrested in Odessa.” (Chronology) (see also The Guillotine at Work p. 567+).

 

 

Vedjukov, Michail.

Folder 76 (1933.)

VEDYUKOV Mikhail Apollonovich (1905 - 12.10.1937)

No further information.

Update: Mikhail Apollonovich Vedyukov (1905 – 12.10.1937) was a participant of the underground anarchist movement in Kazan from the mid 1920s. Arrested several times by the OGPU-NKVD, he served three years in political isolators and at least three years in exile. (Research by A. Dubovik.)

 

 

Veger, Marija M.

Folder 76 (1933.)

VEGER Maria Moiseevna

“Schoolteacher. Arrested in Petrograd in 1921 for possession of anarchist books. Administratively banished to Arkhangel for two years. Where she contracted malaria. In 1922, after a six month journey, she managed to escape and hid in Petrograd under an assumed name. Rearrested in July 1923, during a round-up of anarchists, she was committed to the GPU prison in Gorokhovaya Street in Petrograd. And was held in a cork-floored cell for eight days. Following a five day hunger strike, she was banished administratively to the Solovki Islands for three years. Stricken with malaria and scurvy, she was continually ill. Scurvy cost her all her teeth. From Solovki she was sent to the cellular prison in Verkhne-Uralsk and then, in 1926, was banished to Arkhangel. During her years in prison she went on hunger strike several times for periods ranging between six and eleven days.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.

 

 

Venger, Rachil'.

Folder 76 (1931, 1932.)

Not identified.

 

 

Viktorov, Nikolaj.

Folder 77 (1929)

VIKTOROV Nikolai Alekseevich

“An anarchist of many years standing, recently completed his term of exile in the village of Samarovo. Instead of being liberated he was sent for six months to prison in Tobolsk, Siberia, for allegedly ‘insulting a policeman,’ whom he had called gendarme. At the expiration of that new sentence, was he liberated? Oh, no! In accordance with  the established policy of the G.P.U. he has now been exiled together with his wife [Tsoyrif DI] and small child to Saratov. Not being members of any union, neither Victorov nor his wife are able to secure work; on the other hand, they cannot join any union because as exiles they are forbidden by Bolshevik law to do so. Both are entirely without means of subsistance, and their case is further aggravated by Victorov’s illness.” (see The Guillotine at Work p. 575).

 

 

Volkov, Gennadij G.

Folder 77 (1934.)

VOLKOV Gennady Grigoryevich (1901-1938)

No further information.

 

 

Vsevolžskij, Michail.

Folder 77 (1930, 1931.)

VSEVOLOZHSKY Mikhail

Exiled to Irbit. – “Bulletin of the Relief Fund of the International Working Men’s Association for Anarchists and Anarcho-syndicalists imprisoned and exiled in Russia” November-December 1930.

 

 

Vulis, Abram S.

Folder 77 (1929-1931, 1933, 1934 and n.d.)

VULIS Abram

Exiled in Narym, then moved to Minusinsk on account of ill-health. (see The Guillotine at Work p. 596).

Abram Solomonovich Vulis (1894 – ?) was born in Bila Tserkva, Ukraine. He worked as an artisan and as a baker. He became an anarchist in 1910, emigrated to the USA, and took part in the anarcho-syndicalist movement there in 1911–1917. In 1917 he returned to Odessa and was active in the revolution and underground. In the 1920s he headed an underground group of anarchists in Odessa, and his apartment was used for their meetings. He maintained contacts with anarchists in Kharkov and the USA, from whom he received anarchist literature. Arrested in January 1929 for distributing anarchist leaflets and underground activity, he served three years of exile, after which he settled in Bila Tserkva. Arrested in 1938 for underground anarchist activity, he was probably repressed in the same year. [Research by V. A. Savchenko, "The Fate of the Odessa Anarchists (1930s)", Yugo-Zapad. Odessika 19 (2015), pp. 176–212.]

 

 

Zil'ber, Semen.

Folder 78 (1930.)

ZILBER [Zilberg] Semyon Mikhailovich (1897-29.10.1937)

“Garment-worker. Emigrated abroad under tsarist rule, returning to take part in the Russian revolution. Took part in the armed resistance against the Whites in Odessa. Later he worked in the factories of a clothing trust in Moscow. Very highly respected by his fellow tradesmen, he served on the Moscow trade union bureau for a time. He was then appointed by the union to follow a course at the workers' university. Arrested in 1923 for membership of a study circle reading the works of certain anarchist writers allowed by the Russian censors. Served three years in exile in Tobolsk province (Siberia). Having served that punishment, he was then sentenced to a further three years' exile in Tver.” “Bolshevik Repression of Russian Anarchists” Paris, November 1926.?

 

 

Zolotarev, Andrej.

Folder 78 (1929-1932 and n.d.)

ZOLOTAREV Andrei Leonidovich (1901-12.08.1937)

Exiled in Poltava. (see The Guillotine at Work p. 597).

 

 

Žezlova, Basja.

Folder 78 (1928, 1929, 1939, 1934 and n.d.)

Zhezlova, Basya

Exiled in Tula and then Simferopol (see The Guillotine at Work p. 591, 597).

 

Comments (31)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 10:05 pm on Dec 20, 2014

The criminal file of Rachil' Venger was recently discovered in the Odessa archive of the Ukrainian GPU. She was born in Bessarabia in 1906 and emigrated to France in 1924. Living In Paris, she got to know Dubinsky, Makhno, and Arshinov, among others. In 1931 she moved to the USSR, settling in Odessa. In 1933 she was arrested by the GPU under suspicion of being an agent of the Paris branch of the Anarchist Black Cross, and sentenced to three years of exile in Kazakhstan.

Malcolm Archibald said

at 10:24 pm on Dec 20, 2014

Yakov Maksimovich Gekselman and Maria Maksimovna Gekselman were indeed brother and sister. Maria was arrested in 1927 and Yakov in 1929; both were exiled. Two other siblings, Betya and Felicia, were also anarchists. Betya was arrested and exiled in 1927. Felicia was arrested "for anarchism" in 1929, but released after two weeks. She was a schoolteacher who graduated from a teachers' college in Odessa in 1925 and taught geography in the city's schools. The family was originally from Warsaw.

john said

at 11:44 am on Dec 27, 2014

Thanks, Malcolm, great stuff. 'F. Gexelman' is mentioned as being arrested in 1933 in Odessa [Aid Fund typescript in Berkman 129 folder, IISH at Amsterdam]. Presumably this is Felicia.

Malcolm Archibald said

at 9:03 pm on Jul 25, 2015

Kira Arkadevna Shtyurmer (1902–1937) was from the aristocracy, the niece or grand-niece of a tsarist minister. She supported the revolution and became an anarchist in 1920 (her brother Georgiy was also an anarchist). The rest of her life was spent mostly in prison or exile until she was shot on November 13 1937. (Research by A. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 9:23 pm on Jul 25, 2015

Mikhail Apollonovich Vedyukov (1905 – 12.10.1937) was a participant of the underground anarchist movement in Kazan from the mid 1920s. Arrested several times by the OGPU-NKVD, he served three years in political isolators and at least three years in exile. (Research by A. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 9:23 pm on Jul 25, 2015

Aron Abramovich Vaynshteyn (1891–1938) became an anarchist still in tsarist times, emigrated to the USA, and returned to Ukraine after the Revolution to carry on an underground struggle against the Whites. After the civil war ended, he was arrested numerous times for anti-soviet activity. He was shot at Kazan on January 9 1938. (Research by A. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 9:40 pm on Jul 25, 2015

Lev Bentsionovich Vaynberg (1895–1937) took part in the underground anarchist movement in Odessa in the 1920s. Arrested in 1929, he served a term of exile in the Northern Urals and in Voronezh, where he was again arrested in 1934 for belonging to a group led by Aron Baron. From 1936 he was found in the Dalstroy camps, where he was shot on November 27 1937. (Research by A. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 8:33 pm on Jul 26, 2015

Ajzek Gershevich Tarasjuk (1897 – ?) joined the anarchist movement in 1917–1918. During the Civil War he was active in the anarchist underground in Odessa against the Whites, and then against the Soviet authorities. He was arrested during the liquidation of the Odessa anarchist groups in 1929. He served terms of exile in the North, in Voronezh, and in Kustana (Kazakhstan), while continuing to take part in anarchist activities. He was arrested again in 1934 and in 1937. On December 27 1937, in Chimkent (Kazakhstan), he received a 10 year sentence from a NKVD troika. His subsequent fate is unknown. (Research by A. V. Dubovik and V. A. Savchenko.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 8:42 pm on Jul 26, 2015

Evgeny Nikolaevich Sharbe-Bryukhanov (1896–1938) took part in the underground anarchist movement of the 1920s. Beginning in 1925, he served a sentence in the Solovetsky concentration camp, followed by terms of exile in Siberia. He was shot on October 28 1938 in Krasnoyarsk. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 10:35 pm on Jul 26, 2015

Nikolay Aleksandrovich Solntsev (1892 – ?) became an anarcho-communist in 1912, took part in the anarchist movement in Petersburg - Petrograd, and was a regular contributor and editor of the newspaper "Burevestnik" (1917–1918). He was arrested at the end of 1918 and exiled to Vologda, where he became one of the leaders of the Northern Federation of Anarcho-Communists in the early 1920s. During the 1920s and 1930s he was constantly subject to arrest and exile as an "incorrigible anarchist". On November 6 1941 a military tribunal in Kasimov (Ryazan oblast) sentenced him to 10 years in a concentration camp. His subsequent fate is unknown. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 9:20 pm on Jul 27, 2015

Alexei Vasilevich Maksimov (1903–1937), an anarcho-syndicalist from the early 1920s, was arrested in 1924 for belonging to an anarchist circle of Petrograd students. He served three years in a Solvetsky concentration camp. In 1927–1933 he was exiled to the Northern Urals. During this period he kept busy with regional historical, archeological and geological research, and contributed his efforts to the Northern Urals Expedition (1927) and the Zoological Museum of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR. At the same time, he maintained contacts with the anarchist emigration and with other comrades in exile. He was shot in Ufa on December 25 1937. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 9:48 pm on Jul 27, 2015

Otto Ioganovich Sall' (1901–1938), a native of Estonia, was working as an assembler at the Leningrad Electro-Apparat plant in 1938 when he was arrested and charged under Article 58-6 of the Criminal Code (espionage). He was shot in Leningrad on May 5 1938. Officially he was described as "bespartiynyy" [non-party], often a euphemism for "anarchist".

CIRA said

at 7:05 am on Aug 1, 2015

Šapiro, Rachil' : some of the letters are not from her but from her son David (Dodek), born around 1918, whose father (Alexander Tanaroff or Sacha Piotr or Alexander Shapiro) went into exile in 1921, lived in Berllin and Paris and was the father of the mathematician Alexandre Grothendieck. See Winfried Scharlau, Who is Alexander Grothendieck, part I, publ. Books on Demand, 2011.

Malcolm Archibald said

at 8:15 pm on Aug 1, 2015

Otto Ottovich Retovsky (1902–1938) led an underground anarchist group in Yusovka (Dontetsk) in the early 1920s. He was first arrested in 1924, served three years in prison and 11 years in exile. He collaborated with other exiled anarchists in Tashkent and Siberia, frequently engaging in hunger strikes and other acts of protest. In May 4 1938 he was shot after being convicted of starting a "counter-revolutionary anarcho-terrorist organization". (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 10:01 pm on Aug 2, 2015

Victor Sergeevich Pikunov (27.12.1900 – 12.06.1984) was born in the city of Sergiyev Posad near Moscow. After finishing his gymnasium studies in 1918, he joined the Red Army and served four years; upon being demobilized he entered a program of veterinary medicine, but had to withdraw for lack of financial support. He was an anarchist from 1922 and took part in creating and leading legal and underground anarchist circles in Moscow and the surrounding region. He spent two years on the All-Union "most wanted" list before being arrested in late 1926. He served three years in a polit-isolator and three years of exile, during which he initiated many protest actions by political prisoners. After his release from exile, he worked as a casual labourer until he was able to complete a forestry course which allowed him to work in this field for many years, eventually retiring with a pension. In the late 1950s he collaborated in an unsuccessful attempt to resurrect the anarcho-mystical order. He remained an anarchist and anarcho-mystic till the end of his life. [Research by A. L. Nikitin, "Order of Russian Templars", Vol. 1 (Moscow, 2003); and A. V. Dubovik.]

Malcolm Archibald said

at 10:23 pm on Aug 2, 2015

Nikolai Matveevich Tumanov (1902–1937) joined an anarcho-syndicalist group in Kineshma (Ivanovo-Voznesensk province) in the early 1920s. He was arrested several times, starting in 1924, and spent the rest of his life in prisons, camps, or exile, including Solovki. On November 2 1937 he was shot in Kustanay (Kazakhstan) along with several other exiled anarchists. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 8:55 pm on Aug 3, 2015

Abram Solomonovich Vulis (1894 – ?) was born in Bila Tserkva, Ukraine. He worked as an artisan and as a baker. He became an anarchist in 1910, emigrated to the USA, and took part in the anarcho-syndicalist movement there in 1911–1917. In 1917 he returned to Odessa and was active in the revolution and underground. In the 1920s he headed an underground group of anarchists in Odessa, and his apartment was used for their meetings. He maintained contacts with anarchists in Kharkov and the USA, from whom he received anarchist literature. Arrested in January 1929 for distributing anarchist leaflets and underground activity, he served three years of exile, after which he settled in Bila Tserkva. Arrested in 1938 for underground anarchist activity, he was probably repressed in the same year. [Research by V. A. Savchenko, "The Fate of the Odessa Anarchists (1930s)", Yugo-Zapad. Odessika 19 (2015), pp. 176–212.]

Malcolm Archibald said

at 4:28 pm on Aug 4, 2015

Maria Vartanovna Petrosova, aka Maria Vasilyevna Potresova, was born on March 16 1893 in Akhaltsikhe, Georgia. She took part in the revolutionary movement still in tsarist times. In 1917 she joined the anarcho-communists and during the civil war was an active participant of the "Saratov Group of Anarcho-Communists". At the end of the 1920s, together with her husband V. V. Barmash, she engaged in the illegal activities of Moscow supporters of the "Platform" of P. A. Arshinov and N. I. Makhno. In the mid-1930s she joined the anarchist group of A. D. Baron in Orel. Arrested seven times by the Soviet government, she served seven years in camps and 22 years of exile. She survived until at least 1957. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 8:17 pm on Aug 4, 2015

Vasily Dmitrievich Makhov (1889–1937) took part in the revolutionary movement from an early age as a member of the Socialist-Revolutionary Party. In 1917 he switched to the anarchists and became a follower and friend of Lev Chorny. During the Civil War he was arrested several times by the Chekists and, starting in 1921, spent almost 10 years in prisons and concentration camps. In the early 1930s he was part of the anarchist underground in Ukraine, which resulted in more prison and exile. On November 2 1937 he was shot in Kustanay (Kazakhstan) along with several other anarchists, members of a local group of political exiles.

Malcolm Archibald said

at 10:14 pm on Aug 4, 2015

Vasily Fedorovich Kosov (1897–1937) joined a group of anarcho-syndicalists in Rostov-on-Don in the early 1920s. After his arrest in 1924 he was sent first to the Solovetsky concentration camps and then to exile in the Urals, where he continued to participate in the anarchist movement. In late 1933 he was arrested in Saratov for attempting to organize an underground group, and exiled to Kazakhstan. On February 19 1937 he and other members of a group of exiled anarchists were arrested; they were all shot on November 2 1937 in Kustanay (Kazakhstan). (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 10:20 pm on Aug 4, 2015

A. V. Dubovik is also the source for the information about Vasily Makhov above.

Malcolm Archibald said

at 8:57 pm on Aug 6, 2015

Nikolai Gordeyevich Bulychev (1895 – after 1937), better known under the pseudonym "N. Otverzhennyi", was active in the anarchist movement during the Civil War and throughout the 1920s. A well known speaker and journalist, he worked on various anarchist publications. On November 15 1937 in Alma-Ata an NKVD troika sentenced him to a term of 10 years of "deprivation of freedom". He died in the camps some time after 1937. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 3:56 pm on Aug 7, 2015

Aleksandr Badin (1903–1938) was an anarchist from the early 1920s and served terms of exile in Siberia starting in 1927. He was shot on October 29 1938 in Irkutsk. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 11:43 am on Aug 9, 2015

Vasily Matveevich Postnikov (1894–1937) was an anarcho-syndicalist from the mid-1910s. During the Civil War he helped to organize Red Guard detachments and established soviet power in Kungursky uyezd of Permskaya gubernia. In 1921 he organized an agricultural commune called "Rassvet" [Dawn] and enjoyed great influence among the peasants of Uralsky oblast. In 1924 Postnikov was arrested as one of the main leaders of the anarchist movement in the Urals. From this time on he began the long journey through prisons, camps, and exile. He was shot on November 3 1937 in Ufa. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 8:52 pm on Aug 9, 2015

Natan Yakovlevich Futerfas (1896–1937) belonged to anarchist groups in Moscow during the Civil War. He chaired the organizing committee of the "All-Russian Federation of Esperantists" (1918–1924), which brought together supporters of anarchists in the Esperantist milieu. Starting in 1924, he was arrested on at least four occasions and found himself in prisons or in exile most of the time. Meanwhile, he continued to take part in the anarchist movement by, for example, being one of the leaders of the "Petrograd Group of Anarcho-Syndicalists" (1927) and by joining groups of exiled anarchists in the Narymsky district and in Arkhangelsk. It was in the latter city that he was shot on October 27 1937. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 7:53 pm on Aug 15, 2015

Andrey Nikolayevich Kalachev (1900–1937), an anarcho-communist from 1920, was active in the anarchist movement in the city of Ufa and villages of Ufimskaya gubernia and the Bashskirskaya ASSR as an organizer and propagandist. He became the director of a peasant commune. After 1920 he was frequently arrested and served at least four years in camps and at least six years of exile. He was one of several anarchists, members of a group of exiles, shot in Kustanay (Kazakhstan) on November 2 1937. (Research by A. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 4:27 pm on Aug 20, 2015

Sergei Ivanovich Adov was sentenced on May 25 1949 by a Special Commission of the MGB to a term of exile in the town of Igarka, Krasnoyarsk Krai (Siberia). (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 3:00 pm on Aug 21, 2015

On March 14 1929 Moisey Abramovich Tsukerman appeared before a commission charged with purging the state organs of the Tomsk Region. The minutes of the session recorded the following information about Tsukerman. He was born in 1898 into a family of colonists. Prior to 1918 he worked in a factory in Odessa. In 1918 he served in the Red Guard. In 1919 he belonged to partisan units operating against Yudenich. In 1922 he was arrested by the GPU and exiled to Narymsky Krai for being an anarcho-syndicalist. Upon completion of his sentence in October 1927, he arrived in Tomsk and found work as an accountant for Leszar (state forestry trust). The commission resolved to dismiss Tsukerman from his job, but to "not object" to his working in other Soviet institutions, so long as he was not dealing with the peasantry. [GATO (State Archive of Tomsk Oblast), F. P-435, Op. 1, D.24, L. 11–16.]

Malcolm Archibald said

at 10:44 pm on Jan 27, 2016

Gennadiy Grigor'yevich Volkov (1901–1938) was a native of Yaroslavl, where he was working as a physical education instructor at the time of his first arrest on April 25 1925, charged with creating an anarchist organization in the city. On June 26 1925 the OGPU sentenced him to three years in a political isolator. After his release, he worked as a typesetter in a printshop in Yaroslavl. On September 15 1930 he was arrested again for anarchist organizing and exiled to Western Siberia for three years. From this point on, Volkov became a secret informant and provocateur for the secret police organs, while passing through various prisons and terms of exile. For his services to the state he was released from Butyrki Prison in Moscow on August 18 1937, only to be re-arrested a few days later as he was searching for more anarchists to betray. This time he failed to emerge from prison. [Volkov's history can be found in "The Order of Russian Templars", Vol. 2, Documents 1930–1944, ed. A. L. Nikitin (Moscow, 2003).]

Malcolm Archibald said

at 11:14 am on Oct 9, 2016

Nikolai Alekseevich Viktorov was born on November 24 1899 in Kremenchug, Poltavskaya guberniia. In 1925 he was arrested for taking part in "Nabat" groups in Ukraine, and served three years of exile. In the early 1930s, he and his wife (D. I. Tsoyrif) directed an underground group in Leningrad which was liquidated by the OPGU in 1932. He was imprisoned in a political isolator until 1935, then exiled to the Northern Urals. His subsequent fate is unknown. (Research by A. V. Dubovik.)

Malcolm Archibald said

at 11:00 pm on Feb 4, 2019

Aleksandr E. Gomeniuk (his name is spelled incorrectly above) was an informer for the GPU, according to the survivor I. V. Arendarenko, writing in "Delo Trouda-Probouzhdenie" #28 (Jan. - Feb. 19, 1949), pp. 10-11. Arendarenko suggests that Gomeniuk may have been responsible for the arrest of Ivan Kruglov in Tobolsk in 1930, accused of uttering a threat against Stalin.

You don't have permission to comment on this page.